Non- Profit and Social Justice Campus Conversation Highlights: Erica J. Eddings and Amber Lung

Erica J. Eddings is a West Coast Regional Recruitment Manager at City Year. She has been working there for two years. Erica will also be attending Campus Conversations: Non-Profit & Social Justice on Thursday November 20, 2014 from 6-8pm In Templo Mayor in The Aztec Student Union. Attend and meet her in person to learn more about opportunities at City Year RSVP here http://goo.gl/bR39H5

SDSU Career Services: As an employer of SDSU interns and/or alumni, what are the strengths of SDSU interns/graduates?  Commitment to the community, preparedness at fairs and career events, and idealism

What benefit do you get from employing them?  Passionate young leaders in our workforce

What keeps you hiring SDSU interns/graduates?  Building a strong staff foundation with diverse talents and people

SDSU CS: What is your academic background? Bachelor’s of Arts, Business Administration

SDSU CS: Did you complete an internship during college? Tell us briefly about that experience and what was the most important thing you got out of your experience. 

Internship #1 (summer after freshman year) – U.S. Supreme Court, intern in Marshall’s Office.  Worked with staff in chambers to complete various projects, attend sessions to take notes and report back summary.  Most important thing I learned, was to be great and learn a lot, as it led to my job after college.

Internship #2 (summer after sophomore year) – Six Flags of America, interned as Complex Manager.  Managed three concession stands, while creating trainings, programs, and marketing materials for staff operations.  Most important thing I learned, was how to support and manage others in a fast-paced environment.

Internship #3 (Summer after junior year, and fall semester of senior year) – Thiel College Admissions, interned in marketing and campaign creation, and providing individual experiences to families visiting the school.  Most important thing I learned, feel free to speak up.  If your idea is not used, another time will present itself.

SDSU CS: Please give us a brief explanation of your personal work journey.

I attended Thiel College in Greenville, PA, where I was active in numerous student organizations and service groups on campus and received a bachelors in Business Administration.  After graduation, I returned home to the DC area to work for the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation; where I served as a liaison to members of congress and their staff, developed press releases, and planned numerous programs and events from health expos to legislative conferences.

In 2007 I moved to LA, to work at UCLA in the California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI) as the External Affairs Coordinator, managing outreach initiatives with local government and corporations.  After a few years, managing CNSI’s high school outreach program.  In this capacity, I worked with graduate students to design and run science workshops for local high school science teachers to take back to their classrooms.

Committed to education and service, I am now the Regional Recruitment Manager at City Year, a non-profit committed to reducing the nationwide high school dropout rate.  As a recruiter, I build community and relationships, facilitate leadership and development workshops, and find passionate emerging leaders at schools across southern California.

SDSU CS: What is one piece of advice you would want current SDSU students to know about being an intern? Maximize the opportunity in learning everything about the company and different roles, and leave with a strong network.

SDSU CS: What is one piece of advice would you want current students to know about being in the Non-Profit industry? Days can be long, while pay is short, but the feeling of impact is rewarding.

SDSU CS: What is one thing you wish you knew about the Non-Profit industry before you entered it? Work for an organization that invests as much into its staff as the cause, and the mission hits close to home. Makes work not seem much like work!

SDSU CS: Anything you would like to add? Find what you love, and make a career of it. Stay involved in the community, support youth programs, and be a big citizen.  If we all played our part, what a wonderful world this would be.


Amber Lung is a Field Based Recruiter for the Peace Corps. She has been with the organization for more than 8 years; she was a volunteer for 3 and a half years and a staff recruiter for more than 4 and a half. Amber will be attending Campus Conversations: Non-Profit & Social Justice on Thursday November 20, 2014 from 6-8pm in Templo Mayor in The Aztec Student Union. Attend and meet her in person to learn more about opportunities in the Peace Corps RSVP here http://goo.gl/bR39H5

SDSU Career Services: As an employer of SDSU interns and/or alumni, what are the strengths of SDSU interns/graduates? Students/Alums bring diverse perspectives, practical experience, are flexible, and community-oriented.

What benefit do you get from employing them? We get committed volunteers who are making a difference in communities around the world, by collaborating with local organizations to improve local initiatives and serving as an ambassador.

What keeps you hiring SDSU interns/graduates? They keep making excellent Peace Corps Volunteers!

SDSU CS: What is your academic background?  MPH, Epidemiology (from SDSU 2014); BS/BA, Biology & Communications (from UCSD 2004)

SDSU CS: Did you complete an internship during college? Tell us briefly about that experience and what was the most important thing you got out of your experience.

I completed an internship in graduate school, I interned with the Ladnaan Project, a study researching female Somali refugee physical activity and resources.  We performed community audits, adapted tip sheets to be more culturally relevant, created tip sheets for staying healthy during Ramadan, did literature reviews, and drafted and edited a presentation and publication.

Most important thing was learning more about the overall field of refugee health, as well as learning a little more about the East African, and specifically, Somali cultures.  This is included health literacy, environmental barriers, cultural differences, etc. and the incredible importance of understanding a culture, having buy-in, working with individuals from the local population, to ultimately adapt programming where needed.

I did not have an internship in undergrad, but I did work as a research assistant and was very involved in student organizations/community service.

SDSU CS: Please give us a brief explanation of your personal work journey.

Out of college I was a HIV Test Counselor in San Francisco, before serving for three and a half years in Peace Corps Namibia.  There, I was a Community Health & HIV/AIDS Program Adviser, and worked on small business, agriculture, and youth development projects on the side.  Upon my return, I worked briefly as a lab technician before returning to Peace Corps as a staff recruiter with the Los Angeles Regional Office.  I moved to San Diego to continue as a Field Based Recruiter while studying public health.

SDSU CS: What is one piece of advice you would want current SDSU students to know about being an intern? There are millions of transferable skills you’ll gain, regardless of the specific field you are interning in, or plan to work in.

SDSU CS: What is one piece of advice would you want current students to know about being in the Non-Profit industry?  Find a healthy work/life balance, ways to self-care, etc.

SDSU CS: What is one thing you wish you knew about the Non-Profit industry before you entered it? How to guard against burnout.  The field is filled with passionate, dedicated individuals, committed to the cause they are championing.  In a field with often limited resources, we often go the extra mile – but in extra time, personal resources, etc.  This is laudable, but I needed to find a better work/life balance initially – rather than going at full speed for months at a time and then crashing.

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